Sunday, 4 October 2009

Those wacky communists, eh?

We ask that the government undertake the obligation above all of providing citizens with adequate opportunity for employment and earning a living. The activities of the individual must not be allowed to clash with the interests of the community, but must take place within its confines and be for the good of all. Therefore, we demand: … an end to the power of the financial interests. We demand profit sharing in big business. We demand a broad extension of care for the aged. We demand … the greatest possible consideration of small business in the purchases of national, state, and municipal governments. In order to make possible to every capable and industrious [citizen] the attainment of higher education and thus the achievement of a post of leadership, the government must provide an all-around enlargement of our entire system of public education … We demand the education at government expense of gifted children of poor parents … The government must undertake the improvement of public health – by protecting mother and child, by prohibiting child labor … by the greatest possible support for all clubs concerned with the physical education of youth. We combat the … materialistic spirit within and without us, and are convinced that a permanent recovery of our people can only proceed from within on the foundation of the common good before the individual good.


Doesn't that sound a lot like what Labour is trying to do? Does it not sound a lot like a communist manifesto? And some of it sounds very Tory, too.

Er, well ...

– From the political program of the Nazi Party, adopted in Munich, February 24, 1920.

12 comments:

Simon Cooke said...

"Clubs concerned with the physical education of youth...?"

Very new labour!

Anonymous said...

Very surprising to find Socialist policies in a Socialist party, not.

Yet peopele still insist that Fascist are right-wing.

Barry Stonham said...

Firstly, "making" work in 20s Germany was popular, as the dole was shite to non existent. Secondly Adolf took the soubriquet Socialist as a vote winner as the left were popular (ditto Charlie Chaplin moustache).

BTS said...

You pinched that from a Hallmark card didn't you?

Anonymous said...

it's very progressive...

David Davis (Libertarian Alliance) said...

A lot of it is very internally-contradictory too.

Bucket of Tongues said...

All of which means nothing - manifestos meant nothing to Hitler; they were just compromises to neutralise opponents, which he had no intention of following if they tied his hands. So of course as David Davis says ^^ it's self-contradictory. The more extreme a party, the further it is from real power, the more outlandish its manifesto promises. (See the BNP; Green Party; UKIP).

ScotsToryB said...

'Firstly, "making" work in 20s Germany was popular, as the dole was shite to non existent. Secondly Adolf took the soubriquet Socialist as a vote winner as the left were popular (ditto Charlie Chaplin moustache).'

Fnar! Ein Dole, Ein Volk!

Nout worse than soubriquet Socialists 'cept them Champagneys.

I take it 'Barry' is being Ironic(Cross, First Class)?

STB.

p.s. I seem to be caught up in WV hell so if this appears twice learn the lessons of history!

Anonymous said...

Seen in the context of the collapse of public morality and the destruction of the middle class during the Weimer hyper-inflation, it seems a fairly logical programme. Get ready, our turn fast approaches.

A. Schicklgruber said...

Black shirts are very fetching...

Weston Bay said...

To be fair to "Barry Stonham" (who he?) I think he was just suggesting that Hitler's manifesto should be put into it's historical context ie Germany in the 1920's. (the Charlie Chaplin bit is lost on me- can you imagine him at the Nuremberg rallies?)

Our own historical context is quite different. For one, there is no appetite for either Fascist or Marxist ideology or indeed any ideology. They were all the rage back then.

Nowadays most of us don't give a flying fart about any ideology Left, right or otherwise. I'm saying this like it's a bad thing. We are living in a uniquely un-ideological time where it seems, to me at least, nobody gives a flying fart about anything- certainly in the political sense.

So all in all that was a rather pointless post Obo.

Naughty Clown! ;o)

Barry Stonham said...

Sigourd Shack, John Steed, C'est moi. Adolf wanted popularity & in 20s Europe who was more popular than Chaplin?